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Walk Score - a new tool for home buyers

Did you hear the news? Apparently oil prices have been rising, and gas for our cars is getting more expensive. Then there's also something or other about global climate change and carbon emissions and such. Oh, and the kids are all getting really, really fat. Obesity seems to create health problems and there is some crisis or other in the healthcare industry too. Wow, I though the real estate market slow down and mortgage lending crises were a mess.

So much bad news.

So, here is a neat tool that could help buyers, renters, and their agents identify properties in neighborhoods that are "walkable." Enter a street address into the system and walk score will show you a map of what's nearby and calculate a "Walk Score" rating of the relative "walkability" of the area for you. Its not perfect, but hey - its a (great) start and a really cool idea.

Pick the right house - reduce your dependence on the car; get some exercise; support your local (micro) economy. Hire me for a closing. Win-win-win.


oh, if you "need" to look at driveability, you can also check out the Drive Score too.

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