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Home owners: Stay safe by knowing these 7 features of your home

There are a couple of things ALL home owners should know about their abodes. The wonderful Art of Manliness blog hits this point very well in a recent post identifying spots in the home that every owner should be familiar with for safety and maintenance reasons. 
They suggest familiarizing yourself with:
  • Electrical panel
  • Water shutoffs
  • Gas meter and shut-offs
  • Attic access
  • Sewer access
  • Hot water temperature gauge
  • Property line
If you had to, could you find all seven? I can, but I'm not necessarily saying that I really know how or what to do at any of these places, particularly if something is going wrong. Fix a gas leak? not my deal, sorry. Close a home purchase? Now you're talking.... 
At least I can point these things out to Susan or the repair dude as necessary and that's a start. I'm sure you will do better. Especially after you read this.

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